FARMERS’ GROWTH
[WORKSHOPS DAY]

Farmers’ land management: the role of the VGGT[ 04/05/2016 - 09:00-16:30 - AVANI Victoria Falls Resort ]

in partnership with FAO

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The tenure of land, fisheries and forestry still represents one of the major challenges which farmers are facing, especially in the developing countries. Land tenure systems determine who can use what resources for how long, and under what conditions, how access is granted to rights to use, control, and transfer land, as well as associated responsibilities and restraints. Farmers, particularly small-scales ones, face the situation of working a land without owner it, exacerbating their poverty conditions and their lack of political power. Countries adopt different land tenure systems depending on cultural, socioeconomic factors and policies which change from a region to another. For this reasons, the tenure of land is a complex challenge to be face and solved.

The Voluntary Guidelines on the Responsible Governance of Tenure of Land, Fisheries and Forests in the context of food security and nutrition (VGGT) are a useful tool to overcome this issue. This product has been elaborated and adopted by the Committee on World Food Security and by FAO in 2012, aiming to provide guidance to improve the governance of tenure of land, fisheries and forests with the overarching goal of achieving food security for all. Disseminating globally the VGGT should be considered a priority, but this is only a starting point: the challenge now is to secure their operational implementation in national contexts to address the problems of land governance and transparency in agricultural land transactions. For this purpose, FAO has developed a framework to increase the use of the VGGT in the local realities.

Governments are the key actors in land tenure issues, since the decision makers are responsible to elaborate policy programmes related to land tenure. Farmers can actively contribute to address the land tenure challenge, putting pressure over the Governments on their needs and concerns. Women farmers deserve a special attention, because in rural areas discriminatory land tenure policies and practices damage women more than men.

All parties, included civil society organizations, the private sector, international organisation, research institutions, are encouraged to use collaborative efforts to promote and implement the VGGT and other tools in accordance with national priorities and contexts to overcome this obstacle to development.

08:30 - 09:00

Registration

09:00 - 10:30

SESSION 1:
THE ISSUE OF LAND TENURE, A CHALLENGE FOR FARMERS’ DEVELOPMENT

Mr Valere Nzeyimana Land and Water Officer, FAO sub-regional Office for Central Africa, Libreville

Dr Munguzwe Hichaambwa Business Development Manager, Indaba Agricultural Policy Research Institute, IAPRI, Lusaka

Ms Prudence Ayebare Policy Research Assistant, Uganda National Farmers Federation, Kampala

 

Open Discussion

10:30 - 10:45

Coffee Break

10:45 - 12:15

SESSION 2:
FARMERS’ EXPERIENCE AND PERSPECTIVE ON LAND TENURE CHALLENGE

Ms Alice Kachere Farmer and Member of the WFO Women's Committee, National Smallholder Farmers’ Association of Malawi, Lilongwe

Dr Dinesh Chief Executive, National Cooperative Union of India, New Delhi

Ms Kristin Ianssen Vice President, Norwegian Farmers’ Union, Oslo

 

Open Discussion

12:15 - 13:15

Lunch

13:15 - 14:45

SESSION 3:
THE VGGT, A TOOL TO FACE THE CHALLENGE OF LAND TENURE

H.E. Ambassador Claudio Rozencwaig Permanent Representative of Argentina to FAO, Rome

Mr Valere Nzeyimana Land and Water Officer, FAO sub-regional Office for Central Africa, Libreville

Ms Laura Capolongo Junior Policy Officer, World Farmers’ Organisation, WFO, Rome

 

Open Discussion

14:45 - 16:15

SESSION 4:
POSSIBLE SOLUTIONS TO OVERCOME THE LAND TENURE CHALLENGE

Ms Rose Akaki Farmer and Member of the WFO Women's Committee, Uganda National Farmers’ Federation, Kampala

Mrs Chikolwa Nsama Executive Director, Zambia Land Alliance, Lusaka

Dr Matt Sommerville Chief of Party, USAID Tenure and Global Climate

 

Open Discussion

16:15

Coffee Break

Building farmers’ capacity to gain efficiency in the agricultural sector[ 04/05/2016 - 09:00-16:30 - AVANI Victoria Falls Resort ]

in partnership with DBV-UNIDROIT-IFA-AGRITERRA

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Farmers’ organisations constitute significant networks where farmers can exchange information and best practices, related to a specific agricultural regional area, as well as identify common challenge and solutions. These networks, facilitated by the Farmers organisations, actively contribute to build farmers capacity building, sharing technical information, advice and training, thus allowing farmers to improve their work conditions and their productivity.

To increase farmers’ capacities, innovative finance systems have the potential to contribute to increase funding for agriculture. This system could involve innovative source of financing in agriculture, both public and private, to enhance agricultural development in rural areas. These innovative financing could also be addressed to emerging agricultural areas of intervention as climate smart agriculture, research and migration. This allow farmers to face challenges derived from climate change, food insecurity, economic and social instability, migration.

A crucial aspect, which will be instrumental for farmers to build their capacity building, is ensuring them appropriate and equitable access to the food chain. Closer business links among the various actors of the value chain have great potential for mutual benefit. Farmers’ organizations can link farmers directly with retailers, exporters, traders or agribusinesses. To this extent, contract farming could be a useful tool to coordinate the different parts of a supply chain, involving various participants and contract modalities.

Farmers are essential actors not only in the food production, but also in the provision of adequate and nutrient food. For this reason, the efficient and effective management of nutrients within the food production is an asset for farmers to increase their capacity building with a double positive effect of guaranteeing the quality of food they produce and of safeguarding soil fertility and health.

All the strategies of increasing farmers’ capacity building need to be not only effective but also sustainable, respecting environment and natural resources. The promotion of sustainable food production, to increase quality and quantity of food, as well as not damage our environment, need to be considered as priorities particularly to foster agricultural development which will be also sustainable.

08:30 - 09:00

Registration

09:00 - 10:30

SESSION 1:
ORGANIZING AND COORDINATING FARMERS - KEY DRIVERS FOR SUCCESS IN A GLOBALIZED ECONOMY

SPEAKERS:

Mr Pekka Pesonen Secretary General of COPA-COGECA, Brussels

Dr Theo de Jager President of PAFO, Johannesburg, South Africa

Mr Aggrey Mahanjana Secretary General, AFASA, Pretoria

10:30 - 10:45

Coffee Break

10:45 - 12:15

SESSION 2:
STRENGTHENING FARMERS’ ACCESS TO KNOWLEDGE TO IMPROVE FOS LOBBYING CAPACITY

SPEAKERS:

Mr Albert Jan Maat Chairperson, LTO Nederland, Agriterra, Ad Arnhem, The Netherlands

Mr Coillard Hamusimbi Head Member Services & Agribusiness, Zambia National Farmers' Union, Lusaka

Mrs Aselly Mwanza Cotton Association of Zambia, Lusaka

MODERATOR:

Mr Koert Verkerk Policy Advisor International Affairs, LTO Nederland, Ad Arnhem, The Netherlands

12:15 - 13:30

Lunch

13:30 - 15:00

SESSION 3:
IMPROVING SUSTAINABLE FOOD PRODUCTION THROUGH EFFICIENT NUTRIENT MANAGEMENT

SPEAKERS:

Dr Yvonne Harz-Pitre PhD, Director Communication & Public Affairs, International Fertilizer Industry Association, IFA, Paris

Mr Fritz Glauser Vice President, Swiss National Farmers’ Union, Berne, Switzerland

Mr Charles Ogang President, Uganda National Farmers Federation, UNEFE, Kampala

14:45 - 16:15

SESSION 4:
CONNECTING FARMERS TO THE FOOD CHAIN - CONDITIONS AND SOLUTIONS

SPEAKERS:

Mr Marnix Sanderse Business Advisor, Agriterra, AD Harnem, The Netherlands

Ms Tiina Linnainmaa farmer and Vice President of the Pellervo board, Finland

Mr David Velde Legal Counsel, US NFU, Washington

16:15

Coffee Break

Innovative solutions to boost sustainable food production[ 04/05/2016 - 09:00-16:30 - AVANI Victoria Falls Resort ]

in partnership with GFAR-UPOV-BAYER

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Innovation is the process by which individuals or organizations master and implement the design and production of goods and services that are new to them, irrespective of whether they are new to their competitors, their country, or the world. An innovation system is a network of organizations, enterprises, and individuals focused on bringing new products, new processes, and new forms of organization into economic use, together with the institutions and policies that affect their behavior and performance. Source, World Bank, 2009.

Innovation in agriculture is widely recognized as a major source of improved productivity, competitiveness, and economic growth throughout advanced and emerging economies. Innovation also plays an important role in creating jobs, generating income, alleviating poverty, and driving social development. The use of innovative techniques also plays an enormous role in the generational renewal in the sector, as it stimulates young people’s interest for the farming sector.

Moreover, when research effectively addressed the realities of farmer livelihoods, and the factors affecting them, it has a great impact on the evolution of the farming systems.

These are some of the topics that this workshops aims to treat. Representatives of different sectors will discuss on how to address farmers’ needs and challenges to access innovation.

08:30 - 09:00

Registration

09:00 - 10:30

SESSION 1:
FARMERS’ ACCESS TO INNOVATION TO FOSTER SUSTAINABILITY IN CROP PRODUCTION

SPEAKERS:

Mr Raul Roccatagliata Economic Studies and International Negotiation, Sociedad Rural Argentina, Buenos Aires

Mr Gracious Hamatala Business Manager, Bayer, Lusaka

Marcel Bruins (Ph.D.) Consultant on Seed, Grain, IP, PBR and Trade, Bogis-Bossey, Switzerland

10:30 - 10:45

Coffee Break

10:45 - 12:15

SESSION 2:
AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH AND INNOVATION

SPEAKERS:

Mr Thomas Price Senior Officer, Agricultural Innovation and Society, GFAR

Mr Peter Button Vice Secretary-General, UPOV, Geneva, Switzerland

Mr Ron Bonnett President, Canadian Federation of Agriculture, Ottawa

12:15 - 13:15

Lunch

13:15 - 14:45

SESSION 3:
HEALTHY LIVESTOCK FOR A SUSTAINABLE PRODUCTION

SPEAKERS:

Mr Koen Mintiens Veterinary Advisor, Boerenbond, Brussels

Dr Letshwenyo Moetapele Sub-regional Representative for Southern Africa, World Organisation for Animal Health, OIE, Paris

Dr. Dinesh, Chief Executive National Cooperative Union of India (NCUI), New Delhi, India

14:45 - 16:15

SESSION 4:
HOW ACCESS TO INNOVATION SUPPORTS FARMERS TO GAIN A BETTER MARKET ACCESS

SPEAKERS:

Mr Peter Button Vice Secretary-General, UPOV, Geneva, Switzerland

Mr Pieter Verhelst Advisor, European and International Affairs, Boerenbond, Brussels

16:15

Coffee Break

Farmers as agents of solution to the climate change [ 04/05/2016 - 09:00-16:30 - AVANI Victoria Falls Resort ]
in partnership with GACSA-GRA-WMO

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Climate change is having and will have a range of different impacts on the agricultural sector, such as changes in production patterns due to higher temperatures, variation of precipitation patterns, and a potentially increased vulnerability of the farming community. Farmers are already on the frontline of climate change, experiencing floods, droughts, early frosts, pests, diseases, and an increase in the frequency and intensity of severe weather events across the globe.

However, the agricultural sector can be part of the solution to climate change implementing efficient climate smart agricultural practices. This is what the farmers’ constituency, led by the WFO, has been advocating for, at COP21 in Paris, where farmers achieved to obtain the inclusion of a reference to “food productivity” and “food security” in the Paris agreement.

The last Conference Of the Parties (COP21) gave the world a binding agreement, an agreement that is going to be the pillar on which build the fight against climate change. This agreement is not the solution; it is a start towards the solution, in which farmers can be agents of solution.

08:30 - 09:00

Registration

09:00 - 10:30

SESSION 1:
CLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION: A CHALLENGE/OPPORTUNITY FOR FARMERS

Dr Albrecht Glatzle Representative of ARP in the National Commission on Climate Change of Paraguay, Asociation Rural del Paraguay, ARP, Mariano Roque Alonso, Paraguay

Ms Kati Partanen Facilitator, WFO Women Committee, Board Member MTK, Helsinki

Mr Jathro Green Chief Coordinator, Caribbean Farmers Network, CaFAN, St. Vincent and Granadines

10:30 - 10:45

Coffee Break

10:45 - 12:15

SESSION 2:
SAVVY USE OF ON-FARM RESOURCES TO BOOST PRODUCTION AND SUSTAINABILITY

Mr Matthew Hooper Counsellor, Deputy Permanent Representative to FAO, Rome

Mr William Rolleston WFO Vice President, New Zealand, Wellington

Mr Doug Avery Farmer, Federated Farmers of New Zealand, Wellington

12:15 - 13:15

Lunch

13:15 - 14:45

SESSION 3:
WHAT DO FARMERS NEED TO ADAPT TO CLIMATE CHANGE

Ms Anette Engelund Friis Head of Program Coordination, CGIAR Research Program Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security, Denmark

Mr Theo de Jager President, PAFO, South Africa

Ms Debra Pretty-Straathof WFO Women Committee, Canadian Farmers' Association, Ottawa

14:45 - 16:15

SESSION 4:
CLIMATE-SMART AGRICULTURE TO FOSTER FOOD PRODUCTION

Mr Andrew Enow Coordinator of the Global Alliance for Climate Smart Agriculture, Rome

Mr Sok Sotha Managing Director, CFAP, Svay Rieng Town, Cambodia

Mr Dyborn Chibonga Secretary General, NASFAM, Lilongwe

16:15

Coffee Break

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