Publications

WFO-IFA-GACSA Nutrient Management Book

WFO-IFA-GACSA Nutrient Management Book

This Nutrient Management Handbook provides farmers and farmers’ organizations with useful and straightforward
practical information on the combination of fertilizers and their effects on plant growth, and offers
the soils, including guidelines on efficient nutrient management techniques on how to manage nutrients,
which should be tailored to the specificities of particular crops, soils and climatic conditions
This joint effort by WFO, IFA and GACSA is a good example of a multi-stakeholder partnership to promote
Sustainable Development Goal 2 and climate-smart agriculture, and our three organizations are committed
to disseminating its recommendations to farm groups around the world.




Farmers implementing the Paris Agreement on Climate Change

Farmers implementing the Paris Agreement on Climate Change

Farmers, especially small-scale rural farmers, are directly affected by the severe weather events caused by climate change. However, they also represent part of the solution and by using climate smart agriculture practices as well as installing renewable energy technologies on their farms/land they can considerably help in reducing the possible risks related to climate change.

This booklet contains a collection of case studies showing the contribution that farmers all around the world are already making in tackling climate change by generating and using renewable energy in agriculture along with adaptation and mitigation techniques. The booklet also shows how farmers are supporting significantly the implementation of the Paris Agreement.

The cases included in this booklet, have been selected by WFO’s members from different regions all around the globe.




CIFOR BRIEF - SBTA 44 - More holistic approaches to agriculture needed

CIFOR BRIEF - SBTA 44 - More holistic approaches to agriculture needed

An analysis of submissions to SBSTA 44 on agriculture and adaptation

By Alaya de Leon, Stephen Leonard and Christopher Martius

 

Key points

• We analyzed the 25 available submissions on agriculture and adaptation as requested by SBSTA 40, and submitted to SBSTA 44. Major emerging findings are summarized.
• Previous in-session agriculture workshops did not place enough emphasis on critical stakeholders such as small‐ scale food producers, food-insecure households and women.
• Separating the social and environmental aspects of adaptation measures from those that pertain to productivity, food security and resilience creates risks. Effective adaptation approaches look at multiple elements at once and seek to achieve multiple objectives.
• Gender relations and inequalities play a crucial role in structuring and differentiating vulnerabilities among women and men in the face of climate change. Women’s agency should be recognized and supported through gender- responsive strategies.
• Platforms for sharing knowledge, information and experiences can serve as channels for collaboration, capacity building and innovation, and as repositories for adaptation options.
• SBSTA should establish a work program for determining how agriculture will fit into the new climate regime.

ClimatEasy: a savvy use of meteorological information by farmers

ClimatEasy: a savvy use of meteorological information by farmers

Agriculture and climate change are intrinsically linked. Climate change is one of the biggest challenges faced by agriculture, food systems and farmers today. Agricultural production relies on the sun, precipitation and wind for pollination. Changing weather patterns caused by climate change deeply impact global agriculture. Farmers need to obtain a better understanding of the challenges they face, now and in the future, and how they can adapt to ensure food production in the long term. With the right knowledge, capacity building and technical assistance, often provided by or through farmers’ organizations, farmers can not only adapt to climate change, but also contribute to its
long term mitigation.

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